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Melvis and Elvis an Indigo “Heather’s Pick” for Summer 2015

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Indigo CEO Heather Reisman has chosen Melvis And Elvis by Dennis Lee, illustrated by bestselling Jeremy Tankard, as one of her “Heather’s Picks” for Summer 2015.

Melvis And Elvis is the Canadian kidslit legend’s first new children’s collection in more than a decade.

Listen to Reisman present the book on Canada A.M.with so much enthusiasm.

Congrats to Dennis and Jeremy!

Gray, Burrows, and Wild win Arthur Ellis Awards

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The Arthur Ellis Award winners were announced last night, May 28, 2015, at a special awards ceremony held at the Arts and Letters Club in Toronto. Among the winners were Charlotte Gray, Steve Burrows, and Elle Wild.

Charlotte Gray won Best Nonfiction Book for The Massey Murder: A Maid, her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country (HarperCollins)

Steve Burrows won Best First Novel for A Siege of Bitterns (Dundurn Press)

Elle Wild won the Unhanged Arthur for Best Unpublished First Crime Novel for Strange Things Done

Congratulations to all the winners! And congratulations to all nominees, it was a fantastic shortlist!

 

Renzetti, Fu, Islam, and Burrows shortlisted for Kobo Emerging Writer Prize

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Westwood is proud to announce that Elizabeth Renzetti, Kim Fu, Ghalib Islam, and Steve Burrows have been nominated for the Kobo Emerging Writer Prize!

The annual award, designed to kick-start the careers of debut authors, will award a $10,000 CAD cash prize to a book in each of three categories: Literary Fiction, Genre Fiction (beginning with Mystery this year), and Non-Fiction.

Our authors have been nominated in the following categories:

Literary Fiction

Fiction (Mystery)

The shortlist, selected by Kobo’s team of booksellers and taking into consideration book completion rates, customer ratings and reviews, comprises five books in each genre. The shortlist will now move on to the final selection process, led by top Canadian authors: Charlotte Gray for Non-Fiction, Miriam Toews for Literary Fiction, and Ian Hamilton for Genre Fiction (Mystery), with winners announced on July 7.

For the complete shortlist, click here.

Eve Joseph wins the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize

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The winners of the 2015 BC Book Prizes have been announced and Eve Joseph has won the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize!

Joseph’s book, In the Slender Margin: The Intimate Strangeness of Death and Dying (HarperCollins Canada), is part memoir, part meditation, and explores death from an “insider’s” point of view. Using the threads of her brother’s early death and her twenty years of work in hospice care, Eve Joseph utilizes history, religion, philosophy, literature, personal anecdote, mythology, poetry and pop culture to discern the unknowable and illuminate her travels through the land of the dying.

Eve Joseph’s work has been published in a number of Canadian and American journals and anthologies. Her poetry collections, The Startled Heart and The Secret Signature of Things, were both nominated for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. She lives in Victoria, BC.
For more information on the BC Book Prizes, click here.

Finalists for Arthur Ellis Award include Mattich, Gray, Burrows, Hamilton and Wild

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Westwood is pleased to announce that five of our authors have been nominated for the 2015 Arthur Ellis Award. Bestowed annually by the Crime Writers of Canada, these awards recognize the best in Canadian crime writing from the last year.

Best Novel:

Alen Mattich, Killing Pilgrim (House of Anansi)

Best Non-Fiction Book:

Charlotte Gray, The Massey Murder: A Maid, her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country (HarperCollins)

Best First Novel:

Steve Burrows, Siege of Bitterns (Dundurn Press)

The Lou Allin Memorial Prize for the Arthur Ellis Novella Award:

Ian Hamilton, The Dragon Head of Hong Kong (House of Anansi)Elle Wild

Unhanged Arthur for Best Unpublished First Crime Novel:

Elle Wild, Strange Things Done

For more information on the Arthur Ellis Awards, visit CBC Books.

 

Kim Fu Finalist for PEN/Hemingway Award and Winner of the Edmund White Award

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Kim Fu’s debut novel, For Today I Am a Boy, is a finalists for the 2015 PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction. The award citation reads: “An unflinching observer of personal history, family history and beyond, Kim Fu writes with a pen as sharp and precise as a lancet. For Today I Am a Boy is a novel about gender, race, immigrant life, but it does not let itself be pigeon-holed, just as its protagonist refuses to be defined. A fiercely beautiful novel, the book is the perfect testimony to the fact that no one knows the last word about any human heart.”

fuFor Today I Am a Boy is also the winner of the Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction and shortlisted for the upcoming Lambda Literary Awards. The novel’s long list of accolades includes being chosen for McMaster University’s 2015 Common Reading Program and the Barnes & Noble ‘Discover Great New Writers’ program, being shortlisted for the Canadian Authors Association Emerging Writer Award, longlisted for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize and for Canada Reads 2015, and being named a New York Times Editor’s Choice. For Today I Am a Boy is published in Australia by Random House, in Canada by HarperCollins, and in the US by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

 

 

Gaston, Rudolph, Sakamoto and Wagamese nominated for Evergreen Award!

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WCA would like to congratulate Bill Gaston, Katja Rudolph, Mark Sakamoto and Richard Wagamese, who have all been nominated for the OLA’s Evergreen Award.

The Evergreen Awards are run by the Ontario Library Association. Adults of any age vote for their favourite book of fiction or non-fiction by a living Canadian author.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.accessola.org/web/OLAWEB/Forest_of_Reading/Awards_Nominees/Evergreen_Nominees.aspx

King and Al-Solaylee shortlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads!

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In the fall, CBC Books asked Canadians for their suggestions of books to change perspectives, challenge stereotypes and illuminate issues. What is the one book to break barriers? That’s the question host Wab Kinew will be asking for the 14th edition of CBC’s battle of the books.

WCA is thrilled that the answer to that question could be the books of Kamal Al-Solaylee and Thomas King, who have both been shortlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads 2015!

For more information, please visit:

http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadareads2015/

Al-Solaylee, Fu, King and Saunders longlisted for CBC Canada Reads 2015

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This fall, CBC Books asked Canadians for their suggestions of books to change perspectives, challenge stereotypes and illuminate issues. What is the one book to break barriers? That’s the question host Wab Kinew will be asking for the 14th edition of CBC’s battle of the books.

WCA is thrilled that Kamal Al-Solaylee, Kim Fu, Thomas King and Doug Saunders have all been longlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads 2015.

The final five books and their champions will be revealed on January 20, 2015.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.cbc.ca/books/2014/12/the-canada-reads-2015-longlist.html

Raffan Shortlisted for BC National Non-Fiction Award

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The 2015 finalists for the BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction –  one of the largest non-fiction book prizes in the country – were announced, and WCA is thrilled that James Raffan’s Circling the Midnight Sun: Culture and Change in the Invisible Arctic has been shortlisted. The award carries a prize of $40,000. Raffan’s jury citation follows:

James Raffan’s Circling the Midnight Sun fully deserves recognition as a book that encourages important national conversations and expands our shared knowledge of the increasingly complex world we inhabit. Circling the Midnight Sun tells the compelling story of those who are most affected by climate change. Raffan takes us on a journey through some of the worlds’ northernmost communities, from Iceland to Russia to Canada, and places in between. The Globe and Mail cited Circling the Midnight Sun as “a valuable opportunity to hear from the most vulnerable, but also the most resilient, residents of our planet. Far from being a cry of anger from a remote land, their message speaks to all of us who live with a changing climate that could soon mean big changes in our culture, too.”

For more information on the award and this year’s finalists, please visit www.bcachievement.com.